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Landscaping Logo Design

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Landscaping Logo Design Explained

Logos send messages about businesses. They help clients and potential clients assess and recognize brands based on visuals and design aesthetics. It is important to have a landscaping logo design that clearly represents your brand’s identity, unique selling propositions, and industry.

Logos need to be designed in sketch form before finishing on the computer

Season To Season Logo

This is especially true for businesses in a visually oriented industry, such as landscaping. People who own a landscaping, lawn care, or landscape architecture business, will want a logo that looks clean and serene, because their business is based on creating clean and serene final products.

Logos need to represent simplicity and natural beauty in addition to the company’s unique personality. Here are a few ways to create a unique, but still industry appropriate, logo.

Elements of a Good Landscaping Logo

Effective logos use the following elements to capture attention.

Earthy Colors

Green is the undisputed king of the gardening logo universe as it is the color most associated with nature. In addition to being a natural king of color, green also represents psychological elements that may match a landscaping brand. Balance, harmony, restoration, and peace are all emotions associated with this color.

Brown also fits naturally into logos of this type because it is a color often found in nature. The right touch of brown in the logo can make it richer and enhance its earthy feel. Psychologically speaking, it also represents warmth, reliability, and support.

Blue can depict a flawless sky or body of water. The calming elements found in nature can create a natural and relaxing logo. Their color inspires tranquility, trust, reflection, and serenity.

Yellow is an optimistic hue that grabs attention. The color of sunshine can help potential clients imagine themselves lounging on their beautiful lawn on a perfect day. Too much yellow, however, can seem garish. If you wish to use this color that represents confidence, friendliness, and creativity, consider using it as an accent but not a main color.

Nature-Oriented Images

Most logos feature graphics that depict things associated with the business, rather than abstract images. This is because of the obvious association of landscaping with things in nature. Using an illustrative graphic allows your logo to make it clear that you operate a landscaping business. An abstract image, on the other hand, does not portray a real object and is not a fitting choice.

Common Imagery:

  • Trees
  • Leaves
  • Branches
  • Flowers
  • Rivers
  • Hills/Mountains (arches of green or blue)
  • Fences
  • Stone Walls
  • Animals/Insects

  • Because the things listed above are common in logo designs, your designer should put forth extra effort to help your logo stand out. If you choose to use common images, make sure that your logo doesn’t look just like a competitor’s. Find a way to personalize it.

    What do you specialize in? Are you a pro at landscape architecture or using the latest design software? Do your front yard ideas always find a way to complement nearby buildings? Your designer should look for ways to incorporate your particular talents and unique selling points into your business logo.

    Fitting Typography

    Some logos feature only an image, others contain only typography. Most logos, however, include both. There is no rule when it comes to choosing typography for a logo. Here are a few different typography categories you might consider.

  • Serif typography (as seen in the Google logo, with lines at the end of every stroke) is professional, traditional, and reliable.
  • Sans serif typography (as seen in the LinkedIn logo, that do not have lines at the end) is modern, clean, and stable.
  • Script typography (as seen in the Cadillac logo, which looks like cursive writing) is sophisticated, creative, and elegant.
  • Display typography (as in the Disney logo, which is decorative) is unique, friendly, and expressive.

  • Work with your designer to choose typography that shows your business’ personality and that meshes well with the other elements of your logo.

    Effective Overall Style

    An effective logo brings together several elements to make something that is memorable and recognizable. Look and feel is important. You should like your logo at a glance. If you have to think about it, something is probably off. Also consider:

    Versatility

    How do you plan on using your logo? A design that looks fabulous on the side of your truck may lack the same appeal when displayed on other surfaces. When your logo is on stationery, business cards, or t-shirts, it should still look good. Because it will sometimes show up in black and white, make sure that the design does not rely on color so much that it flails when the color is taken away.

    Timelessness

    The nature of your work varies from season to season. You do a lot of planting in the spring. Summertime calls for a lot of yard maintenance. Autumn sees you cleaning up leaves. Your logo should not focus too much on any one aspect of what you do. It should showcase your business in a general sense.

    You want your logo to stay with you for years, so keep this in mind as you investigate current design trends. Of course, you cannot predict what will appeal to people a decade from now, but your design should not center around anything that people might forget about within the next year or two.

    Working with The Logo Company

    If you design landscapes, you know some things about what appeals to the eye. But do not underestimate the value of working with a professional when it comes to creating an attractive logo for your business.

    The Logo Company uses a team of professionals to create multiple designs for your logo. A team of five designers is assigned to each project so you will be presented with multiple options. The designs delivered to you though an intuitive project management portal which allows you to be extremely involved (if you have a strong vision) or loosely involved (if you want to leave it up to the designers). Either way, you will end up with a logo designed around your preferences, unique selling propositions, and feedback. Then you can get back to what you design best: beautiful, lush landscapes and gardens.