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Aviation Logo Design Explained

If done right, aviation logo design can take flight. This vast industry comes with many specialized considerations to keep in mind. The logo design you choose needs to be something you will brand your company with for the long haul. It can be beneficial to review your competitions’ logos to see where the logo is successful and where it fails.

Imagery

When designing aviation company logos, the first image you think of is undoubtedly an airplane. While a sleek airplane can make a stunning logo element, it is important you consider whether this image is the best possible representation for your business.

If you specialize in a particular piece of airline technology, you may want to highlight that part instead of the whole. Likewise, if your company is best known for a specific type of plane, highlight this in a stylized way that will remind your customers exactly who and what you are.

Does your airline run exclusively to a special destination? Hawaiian Airlines highlights stunning tropical foliage and flowers in their logo along with the peaceful silhouette of a beautiful woman. In shades of luxuriant purple, this image instantly illustrates a lush island escape. Air Canada uses a red maple leaf to represent the country. It is simple yet memorable.

What first impressions do you want your customer to take from your logo? Whether it is a remote destination, a fast flight, or a touch of luxury, find creative ways to get your message across through your logo’s imagery.

Typography

Typography is about more than an easily readable typeface. The font you choose may send a subtle message you’re not even aware of. On aviation logos, you should focus on a typeface that sends a message of safety, stability, and strength. A sleek sans serif can give your logo a modern air, which a smart choice for companies focused on innovation, technology, and new trends.

Serif typography speaks of tradition and respectability. If you want customers to associate your font with a long-standing company that’s been providing reliable service since the earliest days of the flight industry, serif typography may suit you well.

Avoid script typography or anything bubbly and youthful. Let your imagery or colors add a playful touch to your logo while the font anchors it to a stable base. While taking to the skies invariably offers some opportunities for fanciful logo designs, it’s important to consider customers who will want your overall look to have a discernible air of safety and reliability.

Colors

Just as your typography contains a subtle message, so too can your logo’s colors. Most people associate certain hues with specific emotions. Red and blue are prominent choices in the aviation industry, featured in several well-known logos including Delta, AirTran, United, Southwest, and American Airlines. This is no mere coincidence.

Consumers associate red with strength and courage. Blue is a soothing and stable accompaniment to this exciting hue. Viewers associate blue with calm, trust, efficiency, and intelligence, which are all qualities you want in airline professionals.

While red and blue are time-tested classics in this industry, there are other shades you may want to consider as well. Green provides an aura of peace, restoration, and balance. Purple is associated with luxury. Viewers often think of comfort and security when they see shades of orange. However, be careful to stay on the deeper end of the spectrum with this color as yellow is associated with fear.

Black lends an air of sophistication and stability. White is pure, clean, and sophisticated. Brown is perceived as stable and warm, but may also come with a sense of the rustic and unsophisticated, which is not the best association for an aviator business.

Phrasing

Not all logos include a tag line, but if yours does, make sure you consider the phrasing from all angles. Always put professionalism and safety first. If you can fulfill these requirements while still adding an air of humor, you can distinguish yourself in an instant. Kulula decks its planes out in entertaining designs with catch phrases like “This Way Up,” featured between upward-pointing arrows. The “Flying 101” design includes arrows and commentary pointing out all the essential parts and pieces of the plane.

The one common element with Kulula is the simple typography with a green and white color scheme. Combined with a touch of humor, this airline clearly knows how to brand their product well. If you’re creating a logo for a company with a sense of humor, keep it simple and recognizable. Let the other elements of the company’s marketing style enjoy plenty of attention and “air time.”

Considerations

Designing logos is a careful balancing act. You always want to keep the customer feeling safe and secure, but you may need to incorporate a sense of innovation as well. Finding the line between a sleek speedy plane and a tube of tin hurtling through the air at frightening speeds is not easy, but the slew of successful logos already flooding the aviation landscape proves that it is not impossible.

Keep in mind the many places that your logo will appear. The finished product should look as good on the tail of a plane as it does embossed on a flight attendant’s pin. Stick with logos that work both in color and in black and white. Your finished image will appear everywhere from the company letterhead to employee badges and identification, so you should make sure it will work on several mediums.

Do not forget to size up the competition, particularly if you are designing for a commercial airline. You don’t want to confuse your customers by featuring a logo that’s too similar to another airline. Harried travellers will appreciate images that are clearly distinct so they can avoid confusion.

The best logos feature eye-catching, easily recognizable, and clearly distinct images. The Logo Company will put a whole team of design professionals at your disposal to help you come up with the perfect design. They’ll work with you to create several designs that fit your industry and brand needs.

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