Wellness Logo Design Explained

The health and wellness industry has become an incredibly competitive place where day spas, retreats, hotels, and fitness centers try to attract clients who want to improve their minds and bodies.

The industry’s competitive nature makes wellness logo design very important. Organizations need well-designed logos that evoke positive emotions while motivating them to participate in healthy activities. This need has led to a variety of design features that take advantage of color psychology, fluid typography, and imagery that remind people of health and nature.

Color in Health and Wellness Logos

Most health and wellness logos want to emphasize restfulness or energy. Organizations that focus on meditation and massage typically opt for colors that create restful feelings. Those that want to evoke energy, youth, and exercise tend to use colors that stimulate the eyes and body.

Green has a restful appearance that suits the brand identities of organizations that use things like meditation, yoga, and massage to create wellness. The color green sits in the middle of the color spectrum, so it has an easy balance to the human eye. This balance makes it perfect when designing logos for day spas, hotels, and wellness retreats.

Green also reminds people of nature, which plays a crucial role in the branding of wellness organizations. Green, after all, is the color of thriving plants. Since people who attend wellness centers often draw a connection between health and the natural world, it makes sense to include some green in wellness center logos.

A wellness center logo might also include a small amount of yellow. Yellow reminds people of sunlight, which has an emotional and logical connection to health. Without abundant sunlight, plants don’t grow and humans cannot thrive.

Using too much yellow, however, can counter the restfulness of greens and soft colors. While yellow makes people think of the natural world, it also has a stimulating effect. Before choosing yellow, organizations should consider whether they want their logos to communicate restful, balanced wellness, or health created by high-energy, aerobic style exercise.

Potential members will pick up on these visual clues, so it’s important to understand what an organization offers and how it wants to brand itself before choosing colors for its logo.

Jeunesse Salon, one of New York City’s top day spas, does a good job of striking a balance between relaxing and energetic colors. The top half of the logo contains bright oranges and yellows that stimulate the eye. The bottom half of the logo uses green that lets the eye rest. It’s a great color combination for a day spa that wants clients to relax, but also wants to appear youthful and hip.

Common Typography in Wellness Logos

Nearly all top wellness organizations use logos that have round, fluid typography. Bulky, boxy letters simply do not communicate the message that a wellness hotel or wellness center wants to communicate. Serif typography, for instance, looks too heavy. It makes people think of obesity, which has become the cultural opposite of wellness.

Curving lines, however, make people think of flexibility. The letters often have a Zen-like quality that reminds potential clients of meditation and relaxation. It also reminds them of the physical flexibility that yoga practitioners achieve. Yes, it takes those yogis years of training before they can twist their bodies into seemingly impossible shapes, but wellness logos usually try to communicate ideals rather than realities.

Clients don’t want to think about how much time and sweat that goes into becoming flexible and fit. They need logos that remind them of their wellness goals. One & Only, one of the world’s top health resorts, uses excellent typography in its logo. The letters flow effortlessly into each other like water making its way down a stream.

The logo’s thin lines also remind people of fitness. If the logo’s typography were a person, she could bend over to touch her toes without straining. That’s the kind of wellness that most logos for day spas, wellness centers, and hotels want to communicate.

Imagery in Health and Wellness Logos

Since day spa logos usually try to evoke natural health and beauty, they often include images of trees, lotuses, and other plants. The best and worst wellness logos use leaves to remind people that they can realign themselves with the natural world. Those symbols of nature have become ubiquitous.

Other organizations choose less-obvious imagery that still make people think of natural health. For example, lotuses draw on the social psychology that connects nature with health, while also taking advantage of cultural beliefs that people living in the East (Japan, China, Korea, and the like) have better rates of health than people living in the United States and Europe. The lotus has such a strong cultural connection to the East that including it in a logo immediately makes people think of healthful activities such as meditation and tai chi.

Other common images used in logo design for wellness centers include:

  • fluid outlines of the human body that make people think of vigorous activity
  • the sun, which evokes feelings of vigor and health (especially when colored bright yellow)
  • circles that remind people of flexibility, wholeness, and the yin-yang symbol
  • apples, which remind people of the saying “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” while also playing on the idea that whole, natural foods offer better health than processed foods

Any of these images can work in coordination with color psychology to express a brand’s unique approach to health and wellness.

Creating a Wellness Logo with The Logo Company

The Logo Company offers services that can help wellness organizations appeal to their target audiences. Clients start by answering questions that help the design team determine exactly what they need to communicate. Some wellness centers want to focus on high-energy services while others want to focus on relaxation. Knowing how the client wants to brand itself tells designers what strategies to use when creating initial designs.

Clients get five designers, each of whom submits at least one detailed sketch. Designers then add refine their sketches and add color to create professional logos. Clients then get to choose between those logos. Instead of relying on one logo from one designer, clients get options from The Logo Company. In the end, each wellness organization gets to select a logo that matches its unique vision of health.

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